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Table of Contents

The Automate model provides flexibility to not only change parts of the provisioning process, but also to allow you to automate other operational tasks. Below are some scenarios where the Automate model can help accomplish these tasks.

  • Intelligent Workload Management - An enterprise had a requirement that when a virtual machine has reached a High CPU Percent Ready for a specified period of time, a vMotion should occur to a more suitable host. For this reason, VMware’s Distributed Resource Scheduler (DRS) was not practical, as the CPU Ready metric could not trigger DRS. The solution was to leverage ManageIQ Control and ManageIQ Automate to drive the management of this workflow.

  • Power on only during business hours - An organization which gave a group of self-service users ManageIQ access had a requirement to only allow certain virtual machines to be powered during business hours. This was solved with ManageIQ Automate.

  • Auto-Tagging virtual machines based on file contents - An IT organization needed a way to consume information from a text file on a virtual machine and dynamically populate vCenter. The data used to auto-tag virtual machines is also used to align unmanaged virtual machines to the business.

1. Understanding the Automate Model

Automate enables real-time, bi-directional process integration. This provides users with a method to implement adaptive automation for management events and administrative or operational activities.

1.1. Automate Model

The Automate model is arranged to provide an object oriented hierarchy to control automation functions. The model uses the following organizational units arranged in a hierarchy:

  • Datastore - The main organization unit that stores the entire model.

  • Domains - Domains act as collection of automation functions. Functions are executed depending on the order of Domain priority, which means a function in a Domain with a higher priority overrides the same functions specified in a lower-priority Domain. This allows ManageIQ to specify a core Domain (ManageIQ) but allow users to override automate functions with custom Domains. Each Domain contains a set of Namespaces.

  • Namespaces - Containers that organize and categorize functions of the model. Namespaces can contain child Namespaces as well as Classes.

  • Classes - Templates for a specific function of the model. Each Class uses a Schema to apply to Instances to populate with default values. Each class also can contain a set of methods.

  • Instances - An instance is a version of a class populated with initial configuration data. An instance can include a collection of any number of attributes, calls to methods, and relationships.

  • Methods - Methods are functions within the model. Methods use Ruby code to execute various operations needed for a Class.

ManageIQ contains a set of preconfigured Domains for users:

  • ManageIQ - The core domain for ManageIQ Automate operations. This domain is locked with the following Namespaces:

    • Cloud - General cloud instance lifecycle from provisioning, retirement, methods, email.

    • Control - Control contains email alerts for policy controls.

    • Infrastructure - General infrastructure VM lifecycle from provisioning, retirement, methods, email.

    • Service - Service lifecycle from provisioning, retirement, methods, email.

    • System - System contains classes that can provide the start points for all ManageIQ Automate activities.

  • RedHat - Domain containing advanced operations, specifically interactions with supported cloud and infrastructure providers. This domain is locked with the following Namespaces:

    • Cloud - Red Hat-supported cloud instance lifecycle from provisioning, retirement, methods, email.

    • Infrastructure - Red Hat-supported cloud instance lifecycle from provisioning, retirement, methods, email.

    • Integration - Used to interface with systems outside of ManageIQ. Use this namespace to integrate with additional systems.

You can copy classes and instances from locked Domains into your own custom domains.

Changing the existing classes or instances shipped with the product is not recommended because this may hinder the operation of ManageIQ. You can link to these methods using relationships.

To reset the Automate model to default settings, navigate to Automate ▸ Import/Export and click the Reset option.

1.2. Creating a Domain

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer. The default view is the Datastore.

  2. Click image (Configuration), then image (Add a New Domain).

  3. Type in a unique Name and Description. Choose if the Domain is Enabled.

  4. Click Add.

The new domain is created.

1.3. Editing a Domain

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer. The default view is the Datastore.

  2. Select the Domain you want to edit.

  3. Click image (Configuration), then image (Edit Selected Domain).

  4. Make the required edits.

  5. Click Save.

You have edited the selected domain.

1.4. Deleting a Domain

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer. The default view is the Datastore.

  2. Select the Domain that you want to delete.

  3. Click image (Configuration), then image (Remove This Domain).

  4. A window to confirm the removal of Domain appears.

  5. Click OK.

The selected Domain is deleted.

1.5. Importing a Domain

ManageIQ adds the ability to import an Automate domain from a Git repository by specifying a repository and branch, along with user details. Currently, you can only add git domains via the Import/Export option of the user interace.

Import Datastore

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Import/Export.

  2. In Import Datastore via git, enter the Git URL. Select the branch or tag to use.

  3. Optionally, enter a Username and Password.

  4. Click Submit.

The new domain is imported via Git repository. Note that the domain is validated on import.

1.6. Changing Priority Order of Domains

Functions are executed depending on the order of Domain priority. Use this procedure to change the priority order of domains.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer. The default view is the Datastore.

  2. Select the Domains you want to change the priority order for.

  3. Click image (Configuration), then image (Edit Priority Order of Domains).

  4. The list of Domains selected shows up. Note that you cannot change the priority of locked Domains and therefore locked Domains do not show up on the list.

  5. Select one or more consecutive groups to move up or down to change their priority as required.

  6. Click Save.

1.7. Creating a Namespace

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer. The default view is the Datastore.

  2. Navigate through the various Domains and Namespaces until you reach the desired location for your new Namespace.

  3. Click image (Configuration), then image (Add a New Namespace).

  4. Type in a unique Name and Description.

  5. Click Add.

The new Namespace is created.

1.8. Creating a Class

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer, navigate to the namespace you want to add a class to.

  2. Click image (Configuration), then image (Add a new Class).

  3. Type in a unique Name and Description.

  4. If you want to use the schema from a class that has already been created, select it from the Inherits From dropdown. If the class that the new class inherits from changes, the new class will also change.

  5. Click Add.

The new class is created and you can create a schema, add instances and methods.

For each class, create a schema if you did not choose to inherit from an existing class. The schema can include attributes, methods, assertions, and relationships.

1.9. Creating a Schema for a Class

This procedure shows you how to create a schema.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer, and click the class you want to define a schema for.

  2. Click on the Schema tab.

  3. Click image (Configuration), then image (Edit selected Schema).

  4. Click image (Click to add a new field) to create a new field.

  5. Type in a Name for the new field.

  6. From Type, select Assertion, Attribute, Method, Relationship, or State.

  7. If applicable, select a Data Type and set a Default Value.

  8. Type in a user friendly Display Name and Description.

  9. Check Sub to enable the substitution syntax of ${}. Uncheck it if you want to use that syntax as a regular string.

  10. Fill in Collect and Message as required. Collect is used to roll up values from resolved relationships. For example, a relationship can resolve to a large object tree. Use collect to specify how to pull out data from those child objects into the current object. If you give collect a name value, it will store the method result in an attribute of the current object with that name.

  11. On Entry, On Exit, On Error, Max Retries, and Max Time are fields used mostly for state machines. Leave blank if not applicable.

  12. Click image (Add this entry) to confirm the fields values.

  13. For each new field, repeat steps 4 through 10.

  14. When you have created all of the fields, click Save.

The class schema is created, and you can now add instances to it.

You may need to edit a class schema to reorder, add, edit, or remove a field. Classes define the order in which fields are processed and you may need to process some items before others.

1.10. Editing a Field in a Schema

This procedure describes how to edit schema fields.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer.

  2. Click the class you want to define a schema for.

  3. Click the Schema tab.

  4. Click image (Configuration), then image (Edit selected Schema).

  5. Make required changes to any of the definitions for the field.

  6. To remove a field, click image (Click to delete this field from the schema).

  7. Click Save when you are finished editing the schema.

Once the schema is created, you can add instances and methods to the class.

1.11. Editing Schema Sequence

This procedure shows you how to change schema sequence.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer.

  2. Click the class you want to change the schema sequence for.

  3. Click the Schema tab.

  4. Click image (Configuration), then image (Edit Sequence).

  5. In the Class Schema Sequencing area, click the field you want to change the sequence for.

    • To move a field up in the order of resolving an instance, click image (Move selected field up).

    • To move a field down in the order of resolving an instance, click image (Move selected field down).

  6. Click Save when you are finished editing the sequence.

1.12. Adding an Instance to a Class

This procedure shows you how to create an instance.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer.

  2. Click the class you want to define a schema for.

  3. Click the Instances tab.

  4. Click image (Configuration), then image (Add a new Instance).

  5. In the Main Info area, type in a Name, Display Name and Description.

  6. In the Fields area, type in an appropriate value for each field, leave the field blank if no value is required, or use the default value.

  7. Click Add.

1.13. Copying a Class or Instance

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer. The default view is the Datastore.

  2. Navigate through the various Domains and Namespaces until you reach the desired class or instance to copy.

  3. Click image (Configuration), then either (Copy this Class) or (Copy this Instance) depending on the object chosen.

  4. Choose the target Domain in the To Domain drop-down menu.

  5. The object retains the same path as the From Domain and overrides the class in From Domain if the To Domain has a high priority. You can also untick the Copy to same path option to specify a new Namespace.

  6. Click Add.

1.14. Relationships

Relationships are used to connect to other instances in the Automation Datastore. Relationships are formed using URI syntax. The following can also be passed through a relationship:

  • Use # to set the message to send to the item in the relationship.

  • To pass an input to the method use ? followed by the item to pass.

  • If you want to use a substitution, the syntax is $\{} with the substitution located between the brackets.

Example Explanation

/Cloud/VM/Provisioning/Naming/Default#create

This relationships uses the Default instance of the Naming class, which provides a means for other classes to name virtual machines. The relationship sends the create message to the class.

/Cloud/VM/Provisioning/StateMachines/VMProvision_VM/AcquireMACAddress#$\{#ae_message}

This relationships substitutes the message to send to the AcquireMACAddress instance of the VMProvision_VM class with the value in ae_message.

/Cloud/VM/Retirement/Email/vm_retirement_emails?event=vm_retired

Invokes the vm_retirement_emails instance of the Email class. Also sends the value vm_retired in the event attribute, which is used in the vm_retirement_emails method.

/Service/Lifecycle/Retirement?service_id=$\{process#service_id}

Invokes the Retirement instance of the Lifecycle class and send a replacement value in process#service_id to the service_id attribute.

1.15. Methods

Methods are pieces of code associated with a class or object to perform a task. ManageIQ allows for Ruby methods. You can create your own methods or use relationships to link to pre-existing ones.

ManageIQ ships with a core set of Ruby gems used by the ManageIQ Rails Application. The Ruby gems in this set are subject to change. If you are calling gems using Automate that are no longer in this release, you can install them by using the gem install command.

While gems can be imported into automation methods using require, it is recommended that the authors of the automation methods clearly document the use of gems either in the core set or a custom set. It is the responsibility of the author of such custom automation to own the life cycle of any gem being referenced in those methods.

The Release Notes list Ruby gems that have been added, updated, or removed in the latest version of ManageIQ.

1.15.1. Creating a Method

This procedure shows you how to create a method.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer, navigate to the class where you want to create a method.

  2. Click the Methods tab.

  3. Click image (Configuration), image (Add a New Method).

  4. In the Main Info area, type in a Name and Display Name.

  5. For Location, select inline. Once selected, you will be presented with a Data area in which to write or copy the script.

  6. Click Validate to check the syntax.

  7. Click Add.

1.15.2. Creating a Dynamic Content Dialog

The procedure describes the steps to create a dynamic content dialog.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Explorer.

  2. From the accordion menu, click DOMAIN ▸ Cloud ▸ VM ▸ Operations ▸ Methods.

    DOMAIN must be a user-defined Domain and not the locked ManageIQ Domain. If necessary, you can copy the class from the ManageIQ domain into a custom domain.

    This example uses the Cloud Namespace but can also use the Infrastructure namespace.

  3. Click image (Configuration), then image (Add a new Instance).

  4. In the Main Info area, enter Name = dynamic_list, replacing dynamic_list with an appropriate name for the method.

  5. Enter a Display Name and Description.

  6. In the Fields area, enter Value = dynamic_list. Leave the other fields blank or use the default values.

  7. Click Add.

  8. Navigate to Methods tab.

  9. In the Main Info area, enter Name = \\dynamic_list and populate the Data section with the example automate method below.

  10. Click Add.

  11. Set the automate entry point for the dialog control; use the new instance created in step four. You can create a new domain and copy the method to that domain.

    #  Automate Method
    
    dialog_field = $evm.object
    
    # sort_by: value / description / none
    dialog_field["sort_by"] = "value"
    
    # sort_order: ascending / descending
    #dialog_field["sort_order"] = "ascending"
    
    # data_type: string / integer
    dialog_field["data_type"] = "integer"
    
    # required: true / false
    # dialog_field["required"] = "true"
    
    dialog_field["values"] = {1 => "one", 2 => "two", 10 => "ten", 50 => "fifty"}
    dialog_field["default_value"] = 2

1.16. Simulation

After your model is designed, use the simulate page to test it. It allows you to see the results in tree and XML view.

1.16.1. Simulating an Automate Model

This procedure shows you how to simulate an automate model.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Simulation.

  2. In Object Details, select a type of object from /System/Process/ that will initiate the model. The Message should be create. Type in the name of the Request where you are starting from.

    image

  3. Select the Type of item you want to run the simulation on. Then, select a specific one to use as the example.

    image

  4. Check Execute Methods if you want to perform the model and not just simulate it.

    image

  5. Type in the Attribute/Value Pairs fields if applicable.

  6. Click Submit.

Click on the Tree View or XML View tabs to see results.

1.17. Importing, Exporting, and Resetting the Datastore

The Automate Model can be exported and imported as a YAML file. ManageIQ allows you to back up your model by export. Red Hat may provide you with new or updated classes, and provides an import function for either a class or the entire model. Finally, you can reset the datastore to its default. Always be sure to export the current datastore before importing or resetting.

1.17.1. Exporting All Datastore Classes

This procedure shows you how export datastore classes as an XML file.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Import/Export.

  2. Click image (Export all Datastore classes and instances to a file).

  3. Follow your browsers prompts to save the file.

The datastore is exported as a YAML file.

1.17.2. Importing Datastore Classes

This procedure shows you how to import datastore classes.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Import/Export.

  2. Export the datastore so that you have a backup.

  3. Click Browse to navigate to the location of the file to import.

  4. Click Upload.

The datastore is imported from the YAML file.

1.17.3. Resetting Datastore to Default

This procedure shows you how reset datastore to default.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Import/Export.

  2. Export the datastore so that you have a backup.

  3. Click image (Reset all Datastore custom classes and instances to default).

  4. Read the prompt warning you that communication with the datastore will be lost and all classes and instances will be cleared and reset.

  5. After reading the prompt, click OK.

2. Invoking Automate

2.1. Automate Examples

This chapter describes the ways to invoke an Automate workflow. Automation can be initiated through an alert, an event, a ManageIQ application, or a custom button. The same automation process can be re-used across more than one of these. For example, using automation to remove orphaned virtual machines and instances could be initiated by:

  • An administrator request from the ManageIQ console (from a custom button)

  • An alert indicating the datastore has less than 20% free-space

  • A virtual machine or instance unregistered event is detected

All invocations of an automate model must enter through the /System/Process namespace.

2.2. Invoking Automate using a Custom Button

One of the ways to invoke an Automate model is to map an instance from the /System/Process/Request class to a custom button. Before creating the button, you need to have an instance in the /System/Process/Request class to map to it and a button group to assign it to.

Create buttons for a cluster, host, datastore, provider, virtual machines or cloud instances. When the button is clicked, the model will be invoked for the selected item. For each of these, you can have up to 15 buttons.

2.3. Creating a Custom Button Group

This procedure shows you how to create a custom button group.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Customization.

  2. Click the Buttons accordion.

  3. From the Object Types tree, select the type of object you want to create the button group for.

  4. Click image(Configuration), image (Add a new Button Group).

  5. Type in a Button Group Text and Button Group Hover Text, and select the Button Group Image you want to use.

  6. If custom buttons have already been created, assign them to the button group. If not, see Creating a Custom Button to create custom buttons.

  7. Click Add.

The button group will show in the object type you added the button to.

2.4. Creating a Custom Button

This procedure shows you how to create a custom button.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Customization.

  2. Click the Buttons accordion.

  3. From the Object Types tree, select the type of object you want to create the button for.

  4. Click Unassigned Buttons.

  5. Click image(Configuration), then image (Add a new Button).

    If image (Add a new Button) is not available, that means you have not created a button group for that object. To continue, create a button group first. See Creating a Custom Button Group

  6. In Action, type in a Button Text and Button Hover Text, and select the Button Image you want to use.

  7. Select a Dialog if applicable.

  8. In Object Details, select Request from the /System/Process/ dropdown. By default, the message is create. Do not change it.

  9. Type in a Request name for the /System/Process/Request instance.

  10. Type in the Attribute/Value Pairs fields if applicable.

  11. Under Visibility, select which Account Roles you want to have access to this button.

  12. Click Add when you have confirmed that the button accomplishes the task you want.

The button will show in the object type you added the button to.

2.5. Editing a Custom Button

This procedure shows you how to edit a custom button.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Customization.

  2. From the Object Types dropdown, select the type of object you want to edit the button for.

  3. Click the button you want to edit.

  4. Click image(Configuration), image (Edit this Button).

  5. Modify as required.

  6. Click Save.

2.6. Deleting a Custom Button

This procedure shows you how to delete a custom button.

  1. Navigate to Automate ▸ Customization, then select the Buttons accordion.

  2. From the Object Type tree in the accordion menu, select the type of object you want to remove the button from.

  3. Click image (Configuration). then click image (Remove this button).

  4. Click OK to confirm that you want to delete this button.

2.7. Using a Custom Button

This procedure shows you how to use custom buttons to invoke a cluster, host, datastore, provider, virtual machine or instance.

  1. Go to the page for the item that you created a button for.

  2. Click the custom button group from the taskbar, and then your custom button.

The automate model is invoked for the specified item.

2.8. Initiating Automate from an Event

You can also use a ManageIQ Policy Event to initiate automation. You can either use the provided Raise Automation Event action or create a custom automation action. The first case will start in the /System/Process class, but then go to the Event that initiated the Automate model in the /System/Process/Event Class. If you create your own custom action, it will start from the /System/Process class and then go to the /System/Process/Request Class instead.

For example, suppose that you always want the same Automate model to occur when a virtual machine is created. You would use the Raise Automation Event Action. There are instances in the /System/Process/Event Class for the following Events that you can select as part of a Policy:

image

2.9. Creating a Policy for Automate

This procedure shows you how to create a policy for automate.

  1. Navigate to Control ▸ Explorer.

  2. Click the Policies accordion, and select Control Policies.

  3. Select Vm Control Policies.

  4. Click image(Configuration), then image (Add a New Control Vm Policy).

  5. Type in a Description.

  6. Uncheck Active if you do not want this policy processed even when assigned to a resource.

  7. Click Add. You are brought to the page where you add conditions and events to your new policy.

  8. Click image(Configuration), then image (Edit this Policy’s Event assignments).

    • Check the events you want to use to send to an Automate Model.

    • Click Save.

    • From the Events area, click on the Description of the Event you want to assign an action to.

    • Click image (Edit Actions for this Policy Event).

  9. Select Raise Automation Event, and click image (Move selected Actions into this Event).

  10. Click Save.

You can now assign this policy to a Policy Profile. Then, assign the policy profile to the virtual machines. Every time this event happens on the virtual machine the appropriate Automate Model will be initiated.

If you want the policy to initiate an Automate Model from the /System/Process/Request class, then you can create your own custom action. Be sure to have an instance in the /System/Process/Request class for it to map to.

2.10. Creating a Custom Automate Action

This procedure shows you how to create a custom Automate action.

  1. Navigate to Control ▸ Explorer accordion.

  2. Click the Actions accordion.

  3. Click image(Configuration), then image (Add a new Action).

  4. Type in a Description for the Action.

  5. Select Invoke a Custom Automation from Action Type.

  6. In Custom Automation,

    • For Message, type create.

    • For Request, type in the name of the instance of the /System/Process/Request Class in the second.

  7. Type in the Attribute/Value Pairs fields if applicable.

  8. Click Add.

The action is created and can be added to a policy.

Appendix A: Objects

A.1. Virtual Machine Properties

When using these items in a method, prefix them with vm.. For example: vm.storage_id.

Table 1. Virtual Machine Properties
Friendly Name or Description Raw Column Name

Allocated Disk Storage

allocated_disk_storage

Autostart

autostart

Blackbox Exists

blackbox_exists

Blackbox Validated

blackbox_validated

Boot Time

boot_time

Busy

busy

Cluster

ems_cluster_name

Configuration XML

config_xml

Connection State

connection_state

CPU Affinity

cpu_affinity

CPU Limit

cpu_limit

CPU Reserve

cpu_reserve

CPU Reserve Expand

cpu_reserve_expand

CPU Shares

cpu_shares

CPU Shares Level

cpu_shares_level

Created on Time

ems_created_on

Currently Used Space

used_storage_by_state

Datastore Path

v_datastore_path

Date Created

created_on

Date Updated

updated_on

Description

description

Ems

ems_id

Evm Owner

evm_owner_id

Evm Owner Email

evm_owner_email

Evm Owner Name

evm_owner_name

ManageIQ Unique ID (Guid)

guid

Format

format

Host

host_id

Host Name

host_name

Id

id

Is a Template

v_is_a_template

Last Analysis Attempt On

last_scan_attempt_on

Last Analysis Time

last_scan_on

Last Compliance Status

last_compliance_status

Last Compliance Timestamp

last_compliance_timestamp

Last Perf Capture On

last_perf_capture_on

Last Sync Time

last_sync_on

Location

location

Memory Limit

memory_limit

Memory Reserve

memory_reserve

Memory Reserve Expand

memory_reserve_expand

Memory Shares

memory_shares

Memory Shares Level

memory_shares_level

Name

name

OS Name

os_image_name

Owner

owner

Paravirtualization

paravirtualization

Parent Cluster

v_owning_cluster

Parent Datacenter

v_owning_datacenter

Parent Folder (Hosts & Clusters)

v_owning_folder

Parent Folder (VMs & Templates)

v_owning_blue_folder

Parent Folder Path (Hosts & Clusters)

v_owning_folder_path

Parent Folder Path (VMs & Templates)

v_owning_blue_folder_path

Parent Host Platform

v_host_vmm_product

Parent Resource Pool

v_owning_resource_pool

Pct Free Disk

v_pct_free_disk_space

Platform

platform

Power State

power_state

Previous State

previous_state

Registered

registered

Reserved

reserved

Retired

retired

Retirement

retirement

Retires On

retires_on

Service

service_id

Smart

smart

Standby Action

standby_action

State Changed On

state_changed_on

Storage

storage_id

Storage Name

storage_name

Template

template

Thin Provisioned

thin_provisioned

Tools Status

tools_status

Total Provisioned Space

provisioned_storage

Total Snapshots

v_total_snapshots

Total Used Disk Space

used_disk_storage

Uid Ems

uid_ems

Uncommitted Space

uncommitted_storage

Used Storage

used_storage

V Pct Used Disk Space

v_pct_used_disk_space

VDI Available

vdi_available

VDI Connection DNS Name

vdi_connection_dns_name

VDI Connection Logon Server

vdi_connection_logon_server

VDI Connection Name

vdi_connection_name

VDI Connection Remote IP Address

vdi_connection_remote_ip_address

VDI Connection Session Name

vdi_connection_session_name

VDI Connection Session Type

vdi_connection_session_type

VDI Connection URL

vdi_connection_url

VDI Endpoint IP Address

vdi_endpoint_ip_address

VDI Endpoint MAC Address

vdi_endpoint_mac_address

VDI Endpoint Name

vdi_endpoint_name

VDI Endpoint Type

vdi_endpoint_type

VDI User Appdata

vdi_user_appdata

VDI User DNS Domain

vdi_user_dns_domain

VDI User Domain

vdi_user_domain

VDI User Home Drive

vdi_user_home_drive

VDI User Home Path

vdi_user_home_path

VDI User Home Share

vdi_user_home_share

VDI User Logon Time

vdi_user_logon_time

VDI User Name

vdi_user_name

Vendor

vendor

Version

version

VMsafe Agent Address

vmsafe_agent_address

VMsafe Agent Port

vmsafe_agent_port

VMsafe Enable

vmsafe_enable

VMsafe Fail Open

vmsafe_fail_open

VMsafe Immutable VM

vmsafe_immutable_vm

VMsafe Timeout (ms)

vmsafe_timeout_ms

A.2. Methods for use in Ruby Scripts

To use one of these in one of your own Ruby methods, use the syntax of vm.method. For example, to reboot the guest operating system, use vm.rebootGuest.

Method Description

start

Start Virtual Machine container.

stop

Stop Virtual Machine container.

suspend

Suspend Virtual Machine container.

unregister

Unregister Virtual Machine.

collect_running_processes

Collect the running processes from a started Virtual Machine.

shutdownGuest

Shutdown the guest operating system of the VM container. Requires VMware tools (or vendors tools) installed on the guest.

standbyGuest

Put the guest operating system into standby. Requires VMware tools (or vendors tools) installed on the guest.

rebootGuest

Reboot the guest operating system. Requires VMware tools (or vendors tools) installed on the guest.

A.3. Host Properties

When using these items in a method, prefix them with host, such as host.ems_id.

Friendly Name or Description Raw Column Name

All Enabled Ports

all_enabled_ports

Annotation

v_annotation

Authentication Status

Authentication_status

Connection State

connection_state

CPU usage MHz rate average over time period

cpu_usagemhz_rate_average_avg_over_time_period

CPU usage MHz rate high over time period

cpu_usagemhz_rate_average_high_over_time_period

CPU usage MHz rate low over time period

cpu_usagemhz_rate_average_low_over_time_period

Custom Attribute 1

custom_1

Custom Attribute 2

custom_2

Custom Attribute 3

custom_3

Custom Attribute 4

custom_4

Custom Attribute 5

custom_5

Custom Attribute 6

custom_6

Custom Attribute 7

custom_7

Custom Attribute 8

custom_8

Custom Attribute 9

custom_9

Date Created

created_on

Derived memory usage average over time period

derived_memory_used_avg_over_time_period

Derived memory usage high over time period

derived_memory_used_high_over_time_period

Derived memory usage low over time period

derived_memory_used_low_over_time_period

Ems

ems_id

Enabled Inbound Ports

enabled_inbound_ports

Enabled Outbound Ports

enabled_outbound_ports

Enabled Run Level 0 Services

enabled_run_level_0_services

Enabled Run Level 1 Services

enabled_run_level_1_services

Enabled Run Level 2 Services

enabled_run_level_2_services

Enabled Run Level 3 Services

enabled_run_level_3_services

Enabled Run Level 4 Services

enabled_run_level_4_services

Enabled Run Level 5 Services

enabled_run_level_5_services

Enabled Run Level 6 Services

enabled_run_level_6_services

Enabled TCP Inbound Ports

enabled_tcp_inbound_ports

Enabled TCP Outbound Ports

enabled_tcp_outbound_ports

Enabled UDP Inbound Ports

enabled_udp_inbound_ports

Enabled UDP Outbound Ports

enabled_udp_outbound_ports

EVM Unique ID (Guid)

guid

Hostname

hostname

Id

id

IP Address

ipaddress

Last Compliance Status

last_compliance_status

Last Compliance Timestamp

last_compliance_timestamp

Last Perf Capture On

last_perf_capture_on

Last Analysis Time

last_scan_on

Name

name

OS Name

os_image_name

Platform

platform

Power State

power_state

Region Description

region_description

Region Number

region_number

Reserved

reserved

Service Names

service_names

Settings

settings

Smart

smart

SSH Root Access

ssh_permit_root_login

Uid Ems

uid_ems

Date Updated

updated_on

User Assigned Os

user_assigned_os

Parent Cluster

v_owning_cluster

Parent Datacenter

v_owning_datacenter

Parent Folder (Hosts & Clusters)

v_owning_folder

Total Datastores

v_total_storages

Total VMs

v_total_vms

VMM Build Number

vmm_buildnumber

VMM Platform

vmm_product

VMM Vendor

vmm_vendor

VMM Version

vmm_version

A.4. Provider Properties

When using these items in a method, prefix them with ems, such as ems.ems_id.

Friendly Name or Description Raw Column Name

Aggregate VM CPUs

aggregate_vm_cpus

Aggregate VM Memory

aggregate_vm_memory

CPU Ratio

v_cpu_vr_ratio

CPU Usage MHZ Rate Average High Over Time Period

cpu_usagemhz_rate_average_high_over_time_period"

CPU Usage MHZ Rate Average Low Over Time Period

cpu_usagemhz_rate_average_low_over_time_period

CPU Usage MHZ Rate Average Over Time Period

cpu_usagemhz_rate_average_avg_over_time_period

Date Created

created_on

Date Updated

updated_on

Derived Memory Usage Rate Average High Over Time Period

derived_memory_used_high_over_time_period

Derived Memory Usage Rate Average Low Time Period

derived_memory_used_low_over_time_period

Derived Memory Usage Rate Average Over Time Period

derived_memory_used_avg_over_time_period

Distributed Resource Scheduler Automation Level

drs_automation_level

Distributed Resource Scheduler Enabled

drs_enabled

Distributed Resource Scheduler Migration Threshold

drs_migration_threshold

EMS ID

ems_id

EVM Zone

zone_name

High-Availability Admission Control

ha_admit_control

High-Availability Enabled

ha_enabled

High-Availability Max Failures

ha_max_failures

Id

id

Last Performance Data Captured

last_perf_capture_on

Last Smart State Analysis

last_scan_on

Memory Ratio

v_ram_vr_ratio

Name

name

Parent Datacenter

v_parent_datacenter

Qualified Description

v_qualified_desc

Region Description

region_description

Region Number

region_number

Reserved

reserved

Total CPU Speed

aggregate_cpu_speed

Total Hosts

total_hosts

Total Memory

aggregate_memory

Total Number of Logical CPUs

aggregate_logical_cpus

Total Number of Physical CPUs

aggregate_physical_cpus

Total Vms

total_vms

Unique Identifier

uid_ems

A.5. Storage Properties

When using these items in a method, prefix them with storage, such as storage.name.

Table 2. Storage Properties
Friendly Name or Description Raw Column Name

Date Created

created_on

Date Updated

updated_on

Disk Files Percent of Used

v_disk_percent_of_used

Free Space

free_space

Free Space Percent of Total

v_free_space_percent_of_total

Id

id

Last Analysis Time

last_scan_on

Last Perf Capture On

last_perf_capture_on

Location

location

Multiple Host Access

multiplehostaccess

Name

name

Non-VM Files Percent of Used

v_debris_percent_of_used

Other VM Files Percent of Used

v_vm_misc_percent_of_used

Provisioned Space Percent of Total

v_provisioned_percent_of_total

Reserved

reserved

Size of Non-VM Files

v_total_debris_size

Size of Other VM Files

v_total_vm_misc_size

Size of VM Memory Files

v_total_vm_ram_size

Size of VM Snapshot Files

v_total_snapshot_size

Snapshot Files Percent of Used

v_snapshot_percent_of_used

Store Type

store_type

Total Hosts

v_total_hosts

Total Managed Registered Vms

total_managed_registered_vms

Total Managed Unregistered Vms

total_managed_unregistered_vms

Total Provisioned Space

v_total_provisioned

Total Space

total_space

Total Unmanaged Vms

total_unmanaged_vms

Total VMs

v_total_vms

Uncommitted

uncommitted

Used Space

v_used_space

Used Space Percent of Total

v_used_space_percent_of_total

VM Memory Files Percent of Used

v_memory_percent_of_used

Appendix B: FAQs and Flows

B.1. Phase 1: Create Provision Request

image

Question Answer

Where do I create a new provisioning profile based on a users LDAP group?

Navigate to [VM / Provisioning / Profile] of either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace in your domain.

Where can I specify a pre-dialog to present to a Requester in their LDAP group?

Custom pre-dialogs can be defined in [VM / Provisioning / Profile / <LDAP Group Name>] of either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace in your domain.

I would like to customize our dialogs. Where are all the dialogs kept?

All dialogs are located on each ManageIQ appliance in the /var/www/miq/vmdb/db/fixtures directory.

What happens if I do not specify any profiles for provisioning?

ManageIQ searches for a matching LDAP group in the [VM / Provisioning / Profile] class of either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace in your domain. If an LDAP profile is NOT found then ManageIQ will use the missing class instance.

B.2. Phase 2: Request Approval

image

Question Answer

Where can I specify auto-approval values on a per virtual machine template basis?

Tags can be assigned to templates in the form of [prov_max_vms, prov_max_cpus, prov_max_memory, prov_max_retirement_days].

Where can I modify the default Auto-Approval values?

These values can be set in the [Service / Provisioning / StateMachines / ServiceProvisionRequestApproval / Default] class instance in your domain.

How can I customize the email that is sent when a request is approved?

The Request Approved email message can be modified in [VM / Provisioning / Email / MiqProvisionRequest_Approved] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

How can I customize the email that is sent when a request is denied?

The Request Denied email message can be modified in [VM / Provisioning / Email / MiqProvisionRequest_Denied] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain

How can I customize the email that is sent when a request is not Auto-approved?

The Request Pending email message can be modified in [VM / Provisioning / Email / MiqProvisionRequest_Denied] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain

If a Request Approval requires manual approval, how does an Approver approve the request?

Log into ManageIQ as an approver/admin and Navigate to Virtual Machines ▸ Requests and then click on the request.

B.3. Phase 3: Quota Validation

Question Answer

Where in ManageIQ can I set default quota thresholds for users and groups?

These values can be set in the [VM Provisioning / StateMachines / ProvisionRequestQuotaVerification] class instance of either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace in your domain.

Where in ManageIQ can I set individual and group quota thresholds?

Tags can be assigned to groups or users by navigating to Configuration ▸ Access Control. The following are valid tags that can be assigned to group or individual users: [quota_max_cpu, quota_max_memory, quota_max_storage].

Where can I customize the way our virtual machines are named?

Virtual machine naming conventions can be altered using the methods in the [VM / Provisioning / Naming] class of either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace in your domain.

How can I customize the email that is sent when a request is denied?

The Request Denied email message can be modified in the [VM / Provisioning / Email / MiqProvisionRequest_Denied] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

B.4. Phase 4: Provisioning

Target Type: Cloning a Template to a Virtual Machine
Figure 1. Target Type: Cloning a Template to a Virtual Machine
Target Type: Clone to Template
Figure 2. Target Type: Clone to Template
Question Answer

Where can I customize the email message that is sent upon provisioning completion?

This can be customized using the [VM / Provisioning / Email / MiqProvision_Complete ] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

Where can I change what is put into the virtual machines Annotation after provisioning?

These settings can be modified by leveraging the *_PreProvision Ruby methods in [VM / Provisioning / StateMachines / Methods] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

Where do I set the default VC folder location for provisioning virtual machines?

This can be modified by leveraging by leveraging the *_PreProvision Ruby methods in [VM / Provisioning / StateMachines / Methods] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

Where can I modify the virtual machine customization spec mapping?

This can be modified by leveraging by leveraging the *_PreProvision Ruby methods in [VM / Provisioning / StateMachines / Methods] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

Where can I modify the Clone_to_Template state_machine?

Navigate to [VM / Provisioning / StateMachines / VMProvision_VM / template] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

Where can I modify the Clone_to_VM state_machine?

Navigate to [VM / Provisioning / StateMachines / VMProvision_VM / clone_to_vm] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

B.5. Phase 5: Retirement

image

Question Answer

Where can I customize the email message that is sent upon completion of virtual machine retirement?

This can be customized using the [VM / Retirement / Email / vm_retirement_emails] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

Where can I customize the email message that is sent during virtual machine retirement warnings?

This can be customized using the [VM / Retirement / Email / vm_retirement_emails] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

If I want to customize what gets called during the retirement phase where should I look?

This can be customized using the [VM / Retirement / StateMachines / VMRetirement] in either the Cloud or Infrastructure namespace of your domain.

How can I extend the virtual machine retirement date an additional number of days?

Create a custom button for virtual machines that launches [/System/Request/vm_retire_extend]. Then navigate to the [VM / Retirement / Email / vm_retire_extend] Ruby method in the Cloud or Infrastructure namespaces and set the vm_retire_extend_days value.

Appendix C: Inline Method to Create a Provision Request

C.1. Ruby method

# ManageIQ Automate Method
#
$evm.log("info", "ManageIQ Automate Method  Building VM Provisioning Request Started")
#
 
prov= $evm.root['miq_provision']

  # arg1 = version
  args = ['1.1']
  # arg2 = templateFields
  args << {'name' => 'App'}
  # arg3 = vmFields
  args << {'vm_name' => 'CRM_APP', 'request_type' => 'template'}
  # arg4 =  requester
  args << {'owner_email' => 'admin@asd.com', 'owner_last_name' => 'Admin', 'owner_first_name' => 'Admin', 'user_name' => 'admin'}
  # arg5 =  tags
  args << {'crm' => 'true'}
  # arg6 =  WS Values
  args << nil
  # arg7 = emsCustomAttributes
  args << nil
  # arg8 = miqCustomAttributes
  args << nil

$evm.log("info","Building provisioning request with the following arguments: <#{args.inspect}>")
result = $evm.execute('create_provision_request', *args)